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Full text of "Bulletin of Wake Forest University"

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Bulletin of the 

Summer Session 

1983 



Bulletins of Wake Forest University 



The College 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

7305 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salern. North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5201 

The Graduate School 

Dean of the Graduate School 

7487 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5301 

The School of Law 

Director of Admissions 

7206 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5437 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management 

Director of Admissions 

7659 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5422 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Associate Dean for Admissions 

300 Hawthorne Road 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27103 

919-748-4265 

The Summer Session 

Dean of the Summer Session 

7293 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5664 

Marty Lentz. University Editor 
Terry Hydell, Assistant 



Wafee Forest University administers all educational and employment activities without discriminatioi 
because of race, color, religion, national origin, age, handicap, or sex. except where exempt 



New Series 



larch 1983 



Volume 78, Number 2 







Bulletin of the 

Wake Forest University 

Summer Session 



Announcements for 



1983 



Bulletin of Wake Forest University is published seven times annually in February, March. April, May, lune, July, and August by the 

University at Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Second class postage paid at Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

USPS 078-320 

Printed by Winston Printing Company. Winston-Salem North Carolina 27IOS 



The Calendar 



First Term 



May 25-June 28, 1983 



May 25 Wednesday 



May 28 

May 30 

May 3 1 

lune I 1 

lune 25 

lune 27 

lune 28 



Saturday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Saturday 
Saturday 
Monday 
Tuesday 



Undergraduate registration, 900 am -1030 a m 

1 10 Reynolda Hall 
Graduate registration, 900 a.m. -10:30 a m 

210 Reynolda Hall 
Classes begin in the afternoon 
Classes meet 

Last day for late registration 
Last day for dropping a class without penalty 
Last day for withdrawal with pro rata refund 
Classes meet 
Classes meet 
Final examinations begin 
Final examinations end 



Second Term 



lune 30- August 6, 1983 



lune 30 Thursday 



luly 
luly 
luly 


4 
7 
8 


Monday 

Thursday 

Friday 


luly 

August 
August 
August 


9 
4 
5 
6 


Saturday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



Undergraduate registration, 900 a m -10 30 a m 

I 10 Reynolda Hall 
Graduate registration, 9 00 am -10 30 a m 

210 Reynolda Hall 
Classes begin in the afternoon 
Holiday 

Last day for late registration 
Last day for dropping a class without penalty 
Last day for withdrawal with pro rata refund 
Classes meet 
Reading Day 

Final examinations begin 
Final examinations end 




Undergraduate Registration 



First Term 

Wednesday, May 25, in 1 10 Reynolda Hall beginning at 9 00, alphabetically by surname 
according to the following schedule 



9:00-9:30 A-H 



9 30-1000 I-Q 



10 00-1030 R-Z 



Second Term 

Thursday, lune 30, in 1 10 Reynolda Hall beginning at 9 00, alphabetically by surname 
according to the following schedule: 



9:00-9:30 R-Z 



930-1000 |-Q 



10:00-10:30 A-H 



Graduate Registration 

Registration for graduate students for the first term is in 210 Reynolda Hall, on 
Wednesday, May 25, from 9:00- 10: 30 

Registration for graduate students for the second term is in 210 Reynolda Hall, on 
Thursday, lune 30, from 900-10 30 

Classes and Examinations 







First Term 










First Meeting 


Regular Daily 








Class Period 


May 25 


Schedule 


Examinations 




First 


1:00- 1:50 


800- 9.15 


Monday, lune 27 


900- 


■ 12 00 


Second 


2:00-2:50 


925- 10 40 


Monday, lune 27 


2 00- 


5:00 


Third 


3:00-3 50 


1050- 12 05 


Tuesday, lune 28 


900- 


1200 


Fourth 


4:00-4.50 


12:15- 1:30 


Tuesday, lune 28 


200- 


500 


Fifth 


5:00-5:50 


145- 3 45 


Tuesday, lune 28 


arranged 






Second Term 










First Meeting 


Regular Daily 








Class period 


June 30 


Schedule 


Examinations 




First 


1:00- 1:50 


800- 9 15 


Friday, August 5 


900- 


12 00 


Second 


2:00-2:50 


925- 1040 


Friday, August 5 


2 00- 


500 


Third 


3:00-3:50 


10 50- 12 05 


Saturday, August 6 


9.00- 


12 00 


Fourth 


4:00-4:50 


12:15- 1:30 


Saturday, August 6 


200- 


5 00 


Fifth 


5:00-5:50 


1 45- 3 45 


Saturday, August 6 


arranged 



Special Programs May 25-August 6, 1983 

May I7-|une 15 Anthropological Field Project, Saba Island, West Indies 

May 20-|une 19 European Geography Study Tour 

May 25-|une 28 Program in Film History and Film Production 

May 29-|une 3 Baptist Summer Mission Training Program 

May 30-|uly 8 Archeological Field Study in Yadkin County (First Session) 

lune 2-Iune 4 Quilt Symposium 

lune 5-|une 18 National College for the ludiciary 

(une 10-lune 1 1 Marching Band Workshop for High School Directors 

lune 1 1-August 2 Field Research in Biblical Archeology in Hesi 

lune 1 2— lune 18 American Legion Boys' State 

lune 19-|uly 2 Golf Camp for Boys (First Session) 

lune I3-|uly 1 Learningto Learn for High School Students (First Session) 

lune 13-|une 24 Wake Forest Sports Camp (First Session) 

lune 1 5— July 27 Historic Preservation Practicum. Surry County, North Carolina 

lune 19-|uly 1 Orthopedic Board Review 

lune 19-|une 24 Basketball Camp for Boys 

lune 20— luly 16 Program forTeacherson TeachingtheGifted (First Session) 

lune 20— luly 16 Special Education Program for High School Science Teachers 

lune 20— luly 16 Special Program forTeachers of Advanced Placement English 

lune 20— luly 16 Summer Workshop for Teachers of Latin 

lune 20— July 29 American Foundations Interdisciplinary Program in History, 

Literature, Art, and Music 

lune 20-|une 29 American College of Sports Medicine 

lune 30— luly 1 American Collegeof Sports MedicmeCertification Session 

lune 26— luly 1 Basketball Camp for Boys (Second Session) 

lune 27— lu ly 8 Wake Forest Sports Camp (Second Session) 

lune 27— luly 15 Debate Workshop for High School Students 

lune 27— luly 1 Debate Workshop for High School Debate Coaches 

luly 4— luly 16 Golf Camp for Boys (Second Session) 

luly 4— July 23 Golf Camp for Boys (Super Session) 

luly 4-August 1 2 Archeological Field Study in Yadkin County (Second Session) 

luly 5— July 22 Learningto Learn for High School Students (Second Session] 

luly 1 0— July 14 Wake Forest Cheerleaders Clinic (First Session) 

luly 1 0— |u ly 15 Lady Deacons Basketball Camp 

luly 1 0— luly 23 Golf Camp for Boys (Third Session) 

luly 1 1 — July 15 Pastors Conference 

luly 1 7— July 21 Wake Forest Cheerleaders Clinic (Second Session) 

luly 1 7 — July 22 Lady Deacons Basketball Camp (Advanced Session) 

luly 18-August 13 Program forTeachers on Teaching the Gifted (Second Sessioni 

luly 24— July 30 Global Missions 

luly 24— July 30 Soccer Camp (First Session) 

luly 31-August 6 Soccer Camp (Second Session) 

August 1-August 4 Marching Auxiliaries 



The Bulletin 



The Calendar 2 

Registration, Class, and Exam Schedules 3 

The University 7 

The Summer Session 10 

Procedures 13 

Admission 13 

Health Certification 14 

Admission of Handicapped Students 14 

Room Charges 14 

Tuition and Fees 15 

Withdrawal and Refund Policy 15 

Financial Aid 15 

Employment Opportunities 16 

Veterans Benefits 16 

Housing Services and Regulations 16 

Student Services 18 

Vehicle Regulations 19 

Registration 19 

Class Regulations 20 

Grading 21 

Honor System 21 

Special Programs 23 

Master of Arts in Education 23 

Special Programs for Teachers on Teaching the Gifted 23 

Special Education Program for High School Science Teachers 23 

Special Program for Teachers of Advanced Placement English 24 

Summer Workshop for Teachers of Latin 24 

American Foundations Program in History 24 

Historic Preservation Field School 25 

European Geography Study Tour 25 

Interdisciplinary Overseas Research Program 26 

Archeological Field School in Yadkin County, North Carolina 26 

Archeological Field Work in Hesi 26 

Program in Film History and Film Production 26 

American College of Sports Medicine Workshops 27 

Marching Band Workshop for High School Band Directors 27 

Debate Workshops for High School Students and Coaches 27 

Boys' State Program in Citizenship for High School Students 28 

Wake Forest University Cheerleaders Camp 28 

Summer Golf Program 28 

Basketball Camp 28 

Sports Camp 29 

Courses of Instruction 30 

Anthropology 30 



Art 31 

Biology 31 

Business and Accountancy 31 

Chemistry 32 

Classics 33 

Computer Science 33 

Economics 33 

Education 34 : 

English 36 

French 37 

History 37 

Humanities 38 

Latin 38 

Mathematics 38 

Military Science 39 

Music 39 

Philosophy 40 

Physical Education 40 

Physics 40 

Politics 41 

Psychology 41 

Religion 42 

Sociology 43 

Spanish 43 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 44 

The Administration 45 

The Summer Faculty 47 

Campus Map 52 




The University 



Wake Forest University is characterized by its devotion to liberal learning and pro- 
fessional preparation for men and women, its strong sense of community and fellowship, 
and its encouragement of free inquiry and expression 

Founded in 1834 by the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, the school opened 
its doors to students on February 3 as Wake Forest Institute, with Samuel Wait as 
principal. It was located in the Forest of Wake County, North Carolina, on the plantation of 
Dr. Calvin lones, near which the Village of Wake Forest later developed. 

Rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College, it is one of the oldest institutions of higher 
learning in the state It was exclusively a college of liberal arts for men until 1894, when 
the School of Law was established. The School of Medicine, founded in 1902, offered a 
two-year medical program until 1941 In that year the School was moved from the Town of 
Wake Forest to Winston-Salem, became associated with the North Carolina Baptist 
Hospital, and was renamed the Bowman Gray School of Medicine in honor of the 
benefactor who made possible the move and expansion to a full four-year program In 
1942 Wake Forest admitted women as regular undergraduate students 

A School of Business Administration was established in 1948 and for over two decades 
offered an undergraduate program of study in business In 1969 the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management was formed and the professional program for undergraduates was 
phased out In 1980 the undergraduate program in business and accountancy was 
reconstituted as the undergraduate School of Business and Accountancy The Division of 
Graduate Studies was established in 1961 . It is now organized as the Graduate School and 
encompasses advanced work in the arts and sciences on both the Reynolda and Haw- 
thorne Campuses in Winston-Salem The summer session was inaugurated in 1921 

In 1946 the Trustees of Wake Forest College and the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina accepted a proposal by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation to relocate the 
non-medical divisions of the College in Winston-Salem, where the School of Medicine 
was already established. The late Charles H. Babcock and his wife, the late Mary Reynolds 
Babcock, contributed a campus site, and building funds were received from many sources 
Between 1952 and 1956 the first fourteen buildings were erected in Georgian style on the 
new Winston-Salem campus. In 1956 the College moved all operations, leaving the 
122-year-old campus in the Town of Wake Forest to the Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary. 

The decade that followed was the College's most expansive, and in 1 967 its augmented 
character was recognized by the change in name to Wake Forest University Today 
enrollment in all schools of the University stands at over 4,700 Governance remains in 
the hands of the Board of Trustees, and development for each of the five schools of the 
University is augmented by Boards of Visitors for the undergraduate schools and Gradu- 
ate School, the School of Law, the Graduate School of Management, and the School of 
Medicine. A joint board of University Trustees and Trustees of the North Carolina Baptist 
Hospital is responsible for the Medical Center, which includes the hospital and the 
School of Medicine Alumni and parents' organizations are also active at Wake Forest, and 
support by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation and other foundations and corporations is 
strong and continuing 



Wake Forest's relationship with the Baptist State Convention is an important part of 
the school's heritage. Wake Forest's founders proposed to establish an institution that 
would provide education under Christian influences The basis for the continuing 
relationship between the University and the Convention is a mutually agreed-upon 
covenant which grows out of a commitment to God and to each other. The covenant 
expresses the Conventions deep interest in Christian higher education and the Universi- 
ty's desire to serve the denomination as one of its constituencies. Wake Forest receives 
financial and intangible support from Convention-affiliated churches 

The undergraduate schools, Graduate School, School of Law, and Graduate School of 
Management are located on the Reynoida Campus in northwest Winston-Salem The 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine is about four miles away, near the city's downtown on 
what is known as the Hawthorne Campus. The University also offers instruction regularly 
at Casa Artom in Venice, at Worrell House in London, and in other places around the 
world 

The undergraduate faculties offer courses of study leading to the baccalaureate in thirty 
departments and interdisciplinary areas. The School of Law offers the Juris Doctor and the 
Graduate School of Management the Master of Business Administration degree in 
addition to the Doctor of Medicine degree, the School of Medicine offers through the 
Graduate School programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees in the basic medical sciences The Graduate School confers the Master of Arts, 
Master of Arts in Education, and Master of Science degrees in the arts and sciences and 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree in biology and chemistry 



Libraries 

The libraries of Wake Forest University support research in undergraduate education 
and in each of the disciplines in which a graduate degree is offered An endowment 
provided by a substantial gift from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation and anothet 
from Nancy Reynolds has been assigned to the sustained expansion and development ol 
library resources, especially to support the graduate program The libraries of the Univer- 
sity hold membership in the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries 

The library collections total 849,987 volumes Of these, 649,090 constitute the general 
collection in the Z, Smith Reynolds Library, 88,655 are housed in the School of Law, 98,884 
in the library of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, and 13,358 in a relatively new 
library in the Babcock Graduate School of Management Subscriptions to 1 1 ,634 periodi- 
cals and serials, largely of scholarly content, are maintained by the four libraries of the 
University The holdings of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library also include 25,687 reels ol 
microfilm, 281,566 pieces of microcards, microprint, and microfiche, and 78,581 volumes 
of United States government publications 

Special collections cover the works of selected late nineteenth and early twentieth 
century English and American writers, with pertinent critical material, a Mark Twain 
Collection, a Gertrude Stein Collection, and the Ethel Taylor Crittenden Collection in 
Baptist History The acquisition of the Charles H. Babcock Collection of Rare and Fine 
Books represents an important addition to the resources of the Z Smith Reynolds Library 

The library instructional program includes an orientation workshop in research 













9 


methods, assistance in independent and directed studies, 
sentations as requested by faculty 

Recognition and Accreditation 


and 


bibl 


ographic 


pre- 



Wake Forest University is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools, the Southern Universities Conference, the Association of American Colleges, the 
Conference of Southern Graduate Schools, and the Council of Graduate Schools in the 
United States The University has chapters of the principal national social fraternities, 
professional fraternities, and honor societies, including Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi The 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine is a member of the Association of American Medical 
Colleges and is on the approved list of the Council on Medical Education of the American 
Medical Association. The program in counseling leading to the Master of Arts in Educa- 
tion degree is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education. 

Wake Forest College was accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools in 1921 The reaccreditation of 1965 included the master's and doctoral degree 
programs in the Division of Graduate Studies Accreditation was reaffirmed in December 
1975. 




Samuel Wait, a founder and the first president ( 1 834—1 845 ) 



10 



The Summer Session 



The 1983 summer session offers two five-week terms, with the option of taking one or 
more courses fora maximum ofeight credits per term A maximum credit load in both 
terms is equivalent to a full semester's work 

Most of the basic courses required for the bachelors degree are offered, with a 
variety of advanced and elective graduate courses Some special and unusual courses 
are designed to explore avenues of learning beyond the traditional order The course in 
Learning to Learn, available on campus on a non-credit basis, is a beginner's step in the 
approach to higher education Other college courses in education and in psychology 
explore additional avenues of learning 

All of the basic science courses required for a bachelor's degree are available, and 
the mathematics curriculum includes courses in finite mathematics, calculus, proba 
bility, and computer programming. 




• -• " (Mu.kiNa^ 



Courses in the undergraduate School of Business and Accountancy have been 
•extended and provide opportunities in three stages of accounting beginning, in- 
termediate, and cost accounting In the business area, courses are available in statis- 
tics, quantitative analysis, marketing, and finance, with allied courses in macroeco- 
nomic theory and in the psychology of business and industry offered by other de- 
partments 

History courses include the study of post-Civil War America and a course in recent 
(since Pearl Harbor) American history On the world scene, courses cover modern 
Europe, modern China, and that region of vital concern to all people in today's world, 
the Middle East. The Department of Politics supplements these offerings with a course 
which analyzes the American political system and another which compares the major 
political systems in the world today 

Courses in English include surveys of British and American literature and a variety of 
' advanced courses which range from fourteenth century Chaucer to courses on Amer- 
ican naturalism, on Emerson and Thoreau and on twentieth century' American fiction 

In foreign languages, courses range from beginning, to intermediate, to advanced 
courses in both Spanish and French Additional courses in translation are available in 
the literature of foreign countries, including courses in Greek epic poetry, Romance 
literature, and European drama 

Advanced courses in anthropology and sociology feature two field trips One, to 
Saba Island in the Dutch Windward Islands of the Caribbean, studies sociocultural 
change. The other is an archeological excavation of a prehistoric site in Yadkin County 
On campus, there are courses in marriage and the family, ]uvenile delinquency, and a 
study of the use of photography in the social sciences 

For students interested in religion and philosophy, there are basic courses in each, 
as well as courses in meaning and value in Western thought and one which makes a 
comparative study of the major religions of the world The department is continuing its 
participation in an archeological excavation in Caesarea, Israel in lune and luly A 
limited number of places are available to students 

On the graduate level, courses are offered leading to the Master of Arts degree in 
education, English, history, and psychology In education particularly there is a spec- 
trum of graduate courses for teachers interested in beginning or continuing work on 
the Master of Arts in Education degree Fields of specialization are counseling and 
psychometry, as well as the major teaching areas 

There is a variety of special programs for teachers and graduate students The 
Department of History is continuing its special summer interdisciplinary program, 
American Foundations, for graduates and public school teachers in the fields of history, 
art, literature, and music American Foundations is co-sponsored with Reynolda House 
and includes visits to local historic sites as well as a weeks trip to New York The 
history department has also added a new program this year called Historic Preservation 
Practicum which will involve on-site excavation, restoration, and study of the Grant- 
Burrus Hotel in Surry County The Department of Education is offering two special 
terms for teachers with courses focusing on teaching gifted children All of the field 
trips in anthropology, biology, history, and religion may be pursued on the graduate 
level 

High school students can find opportunities in the summer session of 1983 in the 



12 



Learning to Learn Program, the Debate Workshop, American Legion Boys' State, the 
sports camp, and the basketball, golf, soccer, tennis, flag, and cheerleaders camps 

The 1983 summer session is designed to meet the needs of the following: 

Undergraduates in the University who want to accelerate their education and to obtain 
the bachelor's degree in less than four years 

Incoming freshmen who plan to complete requirements for the bachelor's degree in 
less than four years or who want to gain experience before beginning a full academic 
program in the fall semester 

Undergraduate students from other colleges and universities who wish to attend the summer 
session only and need to take particular courses 

Public school teachers and administrators who need courses leading to the issuance or 
renewal of certificates, or who wish to begin a program of graduate study leading to the 
Master of Arts in Education degree. 

Students with the bachelor's degree who desire to begin work on a master's degree in 
biology, chemistry, education. English, history, mathematics, physical education, 
physics, psychology, religion, or speech communication and theatre arts 

The summer session is an integral part of the school year, and the various facilities of 
the University are available then as in the fall and spring The continuation of high 
standards of academic work is assured by the fact that, with few exceptions, instructors 
are selected from the professorial ranks of the regular faculty. 




The lames R. Scales Fine Arts Center 



13 

Procedures 



All students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with academic, housing, traffic, and other 
■egulations Students are expected to abide by these regulations while enrolled at the University 



Undergraduate Admission 

Admission to the summer session does not constitute admission to the fall or 
spring semester 

Students who plan to attend the University in the summer session only should use the summer 
session application form provided by the Dean of the Summer Session Students who 
:ome under this classification are ( 1 ) temporary visiting students from other colleges 
Dr universities, who must present a written statement that they are currently in 
'satisfactory academic and social standing at their college or university and have 
permission to take courses at Wake Forest in the summer session as indicated on the 
application form; (2) teachers desiring courses leading to issuance or renewal of the A 
orG public school certificates, (3) high school graduates who plan to enroll in another 
college or university in the fall semester, and who must present a written statement of 
(graduation from their respective high schools or have approval to attend the University 
summer session from the dean or registrar of the college or university at which they 
have been accepted for the fall semester. 

Students who plan to begin in the summer session and continue at the University in the fall 
semester should apply for admission to the Director of Admissions, indicating on their 
application the intention to attend both the summer session and the fall semester. 
Students who come under this classification are (1) incoming freshmen and (2) per- 
manent transfer students from other colleges and universities 

Students who have attended the University but who are not now in residence must apply to the 
Director of Admissions for readmission before they can enroll for the summer session 

Students who are attending the University in the spring semester and who plan to 
attend the summer session should indicate their intention by signing and returning 
the summer session reservation card mailed to their home address in April, or they 
should sign a card in the Registrar's Office, 1 10 Reynolda Hall 

Graduate Admission 

Students who begin in the summer session programs of study leading to the Master of Arts, 
Master of Science, Master of Arts in Education, or Doctor of Philosophy degree must be 
admitted to the Graduate School according to the procedures of the bulletin of the 
Graduate School Bulletins and application forms are available from the Dean of the 
Graduate School 

Students who are currently enrolled and who plan to attend the summer session should make 
arrangements in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School 

Students who plan to apply for one of twenty tuition scholarships available in the 
summer session should make arrangements in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate 
School 

Students who do not plan to pursue programs of study leading to the master's degree and 



14 

students who already hold a graduate degree may be admitted to the summer session 
as unclassified graduate students and may take courses for which they meet pre- 
requisites at the 300 and 400 levels Unclassified graduate students are not regarded as 
candidates for degrees Subject to approval of the department concerned, courses 
completed by unclassified students may be applied toward the master's degree if the 
student is subsequently accepted as a candidate for a master's degree. Unclassified 
graduate students must ( 1 ) complete the application for admission, health form, and 
demographic form provided by the Dean of the Summer Session, (2) send a letter ol 
recommendation, and (3) send an official transcript of undergraduate work from the 
college or university from which they graduated Unclassified graduate students 
should make arrangements in the Office of the Dean of the Summer Session, 

Students who plan to participate in the American Foundations Program at Reynolda House as 
unclassified graduate students seeking graduate credit must ( 1 ) complete the special 
application form, (2) present two letters of recommendation, and (3) present an official 
transcript of undergraduate work from the college or university from which they 
graduated. 



Health Certification 

All students who attend the summer session or special summer programs must 
complete the health form for the University Health Service Residents of Winston- 
Salem who have their own physician must complete only the medical history section of 
the form Immunization information is not required, but all health forms must be 
signed authorizing treatment in case of emergency 



Admission of Handicapped Students 

Wake Forest University will consider the application of any student on the basis of 
his or her academic and personal merit, regardless of handicap Though the campus is 
built on many levels, a system of ramps and elevators makes each building accessible 
to those in wheelchairs or with limited mobility. The University will gladly help 
handicapped students in making arrangements to meet special needs Students who 
seek further information should consult the Dean of the Summer Session or the 
University's Office of Equal Opportunity 



Room Charges 

Double room (each person) per five-week term $140.00 

Room charges must be paid in full for the entire term at the time of registration A 

residence hall key deposit of $5 00 is required of all residential students This deposit 

should be paid at check-in 











15 


J 


Tuition an 

Full-Time 
Students 


d Fees 


Part-Time 
Students 




\ndergraduate 
Tuition 
Audit Fee 

\raduate 


$57 50 per credit 
$30.00 per course 




$57.50 per credit 
$30 00 per course 





Tuition $65.00 per hour $65 00 per hour 

Audit Fee $30 00 per course $30.00 per course 

'ehicle Registration Fee 

Automobile $ 6 00 per term $ 6 00 per term 

Motorcycle, etc. $ 2 00 per term $ 2 00 per term 

Each student driving an automobile or other propelled vehicle to the campus is 
equired to register it at the University Department of Public Safety on the same day 
he student registers for courses Automobile and motorcycle registration fees are not 
efundable 

] All tuition and fees are due and payable in advance from currently enrolled Univer- 
;ity students. Students from other colleges and universities may pay tuition and room 
ent at registration. Meals from the University food service average $35 00 - $45 00 per 
week. Costs can be reduced by purchasing a meal ticket following registration 

Withdrawal and Refund Policy 

During the summer session all students may receive tuition refunds according to the 
following schedule This policy applies to students dropping individual courses as well 
as to those withdrawing from the summer session 



First Sess 


ion 


Second Sess 


on 


Tuition 


Housing 


Friday 


May 27 


Tuesday 


\uly 5 


1 00% 


A/1 except $ 1 


Saturday 


May 28 


Wednesday 


]uly 6 


75% 


75% 


Monday 


May 30 


Thursdau 


}uly 7 


50% 


50% 


Tuesday 


May 31 


Friday 


\uly 8 


25% 


25% 



After May 3 I for the first session and luly 8 for the second session, no refund will be 
made. 

Financial Aid 

Because summer session tuition charges are reduced for all students to less than 
one-half the amount charged for tuition in the regular academic year, it is not possible 
to provide additional scholarships for a large number of students However, a limited 
number of partial scholarships are available to in-service public or private school 



16 

teachers enrolling for undergraduate credit. Letters of application should be ad- 
dressed to the Dean of the Summer Session 

Employment Opportunities 

Opportunities for student employment in the summer session are limited to a few 
positions in the library and the cafeteria These are frequently preempted by regular 
students who plan to attend the summer session and make arrangements in advance 
for employment The academic program is accelerated in the summer, and students 
should not seek outside employment unless necessary Students desiring part-time 
employment should consult the Office of Educational Planning and Placement 

Veterans Benefits 

The University has enrolled a number of students who are veterans Students who 
need information concerning education benefits for veterans should consult the 
Treasurer or the nearest regional office of the Veterans Administration The office for 
North Carolina is located in the Federal Building at 25 1 North Main Street in downtown 
Winston-Salem 

Housing Services and Regulations 

Mary Reynolds Babcock Dormitory is an air conditioned residence hall which is used 
during the summer session All registered undergraduate students, including fresh- 
men — who are required to live on campus — are accommodated here. By accepting a 
room assignment, students agree to abide by the room contract and by the regulations 
stipulated in this bulletin and in the constitution of the student body Local students 
or freshmen with approval from the Dean of the Summer Session may live off campus 

Check-in at Babcock is Tuesday, May 24 for the first session and Wednesday, lune 29 for 
the second session between I 2 00 noon and 500 p m A $25 00 refundable key 'damage 
deposit is required at that time 

Room assignments are made by the Summer Resident Director on a first come first 
served basis. All double rooms are assigned to two students, beginning with the lower 
floors. Students desiring to room together must check in together There are a limited 
number of single rooms which are assigned at the discretion of the Summer Resident 
Director 

Room changes and reassignment are allowed during the first two days of the session, but 
only with the prior written approval of the Summer Resident Director The Director 
reserves the right to reassign students for disciplinary reasons or to ensure double 
occupancy and the efficient use of residence hall space Students remaining for the 
second session must indicate this intent at check-in and confirm their plans prior to 
the end of the first session 

Check-out is required regardless of when a student leaves the session It includes the 
following: (a) removal of all personal property, (b) deposit of refuse in the appropriate 
containers in hallways, (c) completion of the room condition report, (d) closing and 
locking all windows and doors, and (e) return of the room key to a staff member. THERE 



■; A $25.00 FINE FOR FAILURE TO COMPLETE THE CHECKOUT PROCEDURE, which 
iiust be completed by 600 p m the last day of the session 
Babcock facilities include lounges, a study area, a kitchen, storage areas, and laundry 
icilities. They are provided for the exclusive use of Babcock residents A guest policy is 
utlined at check-in and during a residence hall meeting the first full day of each 
^ssion. 

Furnishings and equipment are not to be moved from rooms and are not be be used for 
'jther than their intended purpose. 
The rooms are furnished with single beds, desks, chairs, dressers, and closets, 
tudents must supply their own linen, pillows, desk lamps, and wastebaskets Molding 
; provided on the walls for hanging pictures, pennants, and posters, which are not to 
e affixed to the walls or ceilings 

Curtains or draperies must be suspended by temporary spring-type rods with cushi- 
oned ends Window screens must be left on the windows, and trunks or heavy luggage 
lust be stored in trunk rooms Waterbeds are not allowed The University accepts no 
■?sponsibility for students' personal property 

Babcock is a coeducational residence hall with separate wings for men and women, 
'tudents are not allowed in the rooms assigned to members of the opposite sex except 
uring hours approved by the Summer Resident Director in accordance with es- 
ablished guidelines. 

After the residence hall is closed for the night, students must enter by the center 
ront door, where proper identification must be shown to the guard on duty Students 
/ho are involved in incidents which jeopardize the safety or security or well being of 
he students living in the residence hall or other University property forfeit the 
ipportunity to continue living in the residence hall, lose all fees, and become subject 
o disciplinary action 

Students are expected to cooperate with campus guards and residence hall staff 
nembers by providing proper identification upon request Failure to do so is consid- 
ired serious misconduct 

In order to provide an opportunity for responsible living and learning in a safe and 
:omfortable environment, the following regulations have been adopted: 

( 1 ) Cooking and ironing are not permitted in rooms and must be done in the kitchen 
>X laundry 

(2) Electrical appliances, other than thermostatically controlled coffee pots and 
mall refrigerators (1.5 amp, five cubic feet maximum) are not allowed 

(3) Musical appliances and hair dryers are authorized, but if it becomes apparent 
hat electrical circuits are overloaded, remedial measures — including limitation of 
electrical service — must be taken 

(4) Indecent exposure, illicit sexual activity, and public use of vulgar or abusive 
anguage are prohibited 

(5) Students are subject to all state and local regulations concerning the use of 
ilcoholic beverages Public consumption or display of alcoholic liquors, wines, or beer 
n the residence hall or elsewhere on campus is prohibited 

(6) Alcohol abuse, including intoxication, is not tolerated Behavior resulting from 
iuch abuse results in loss of housing privileges and disciplinary action 

(7) Possession or use of illegal drugs (LSD and mari|uana, for example), and drug 



paraphernalia is prohibited. Students involved in the use, possession, distribution, or 
transportation of illegal drugs or contraband on or off campus must vacate the 
residence hall within forty-eight hours and are subject to disciplinary action, which 
may include dismissal from the University Parents of such students are notified 
promptly 

(8) Deadly weapons are prohibited everywhere on campus except in the Department 
of Military Science and as authorized by the University Department of Public Safety 

|9) Animals are not allowed in the residence halls 

(10) Use or possession of fireworks and other pyrotechnics is prohibited in the 
residence halls and elsewhere on campus 

(11) Playing sports in the residence hall areas is prohibited Ample playing fieldsare 
provided close to the residence halls. 

1 12) Rooms in the residence halls cannot be used as sales offices or storerooms or 
for solicitation of sales or gifts without prior written permission of the Dean of Men 

(13) No aerials of any kind may be installed on any University building (including 
window sills) without prior written permission of the Director of the Physical Plant 

( 14) Students are expected to refrain from making excessive noise either in person 
or with sound equipment such as musical instruments or stereos 

Failure to comply with these regulations or the instructions of the Summer Resident 
Director can result in forfeiture of housing privileges and fees Students removed from 
the residence halls relinquish all rights to further use of the facilities regardless of 
rental fees which may have been paid 

Any questions regarding these regulations or summer housing in general should be 
addressed to the Director of Housing, 7342 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina 27109 

Student Services 

Food Services. A cafeteria and a soda shop are located in Reynolda Hall, serving meals 
during the day and snacks at night 

Laundry Service Laundry is arranged for privately. Coin-operated washers and dryers 
are located in residence halls and are not available to non-resident students 

Health Service. The Health Service is located in Kitchin House for students who 
become ill The Center for Psychological Services assists students with personal 
adjustment problems 

Educational Planning and Placement. Students seeking part-time summer employment 
should consult the Office for Educational Planning and Placement Both this office and 
the Center for Psychological Services assist students with educational and vocational 
problems. Persons planning to find employment upon their graduation at the end of 
the summer session should register early with this office 

Recreational Activities The University maintains athletic fields, tennis courts, and 
athletic, physical education, and recreation facilities which include a swimming pool 
handball and squash courts, basketball floors, a dance studio, recreational areas, and 
gymnastics and wrestling rooms The Department of Physical Education sponsors an 
intramural program of tournaments and organized club activities in tennis, golf, 
racquetball. and other sports for men and women Student golfers may take advantage 



19 


I 

two public courses, Winston Lake and Reynolds Park Other golf courses are 

'ailable at Grandview, Wedgewood, Wilshire, Tanglewood Park, and Hillcrest Golf 
ubs. Students can find swimming, golf, horseback riding, fishing, picnicking, and 

ames at Tanglewood Park 
j Historic Old Salem, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, the Wachovia 

istorical Society Museum, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston 
: quare Art Center, Reynolda House, the Museum of Man, the Nature Science Center, 

umerous industries, and the nearby mountains are of interest to those who attend the 
' jmmer session Pilot Mountain and Hanging Rock state parks are approximately 
! lirty miles north of Winston -Sal em Blowing Rock on the Blue Ridge Parkway, about a 

vo-hour drive, is a well known summer resort and features a variety of summer 

;creational activities 

: Free movies are shown regularly during the summer session 
Religious Activities. Religious programs supplement the summer schedule The Office 

f the Chaplain welcomes the opportunity to identify churches in the community and 
!ive any help it can to summer session students Wake Forest Baptist Church holds 
Worship services each Sunday at 1 1 00 a.m. in Wait Chapel A special series of worship 

ervices is scheduled each evening during the Pastors' Conference, July 1 1 — 1 5. in Davis 
! :hapel Students and faculty are invited to attend. 

Vehicle Regulations 

Automobiles must be registered with the University Department of Public Safety on 
he same day that the student registers for courses Registration is not considered complete 
inti! the automobile is also registered, for students in residence on the campus and for those 
>ho commute by automobile to the campus A $6 00 non-refundable registration fee is 
harged for automobiles each term, and there is a $2.00 fee for motorcycles and other 
wo-wheeled vehicles, which must also be registered If the student registers for 
:ourses and later decides to bring an automobile to the cam pus, the automobile must 
)e registered on the same day that it is brought to the campus 

Students are required to establish ownership by presenting state registration, title, 
)ill of sale, or state inspection worksheet. Students are responsible for knowing and 
implying with campus traffic and parking regulations at all times Violators are fined, 
mdall fines must be paid within fourteen days of receipt of ticket After this time, if the 
ine is not paid the car is considered in violation of University policy, is banned from 
he campus, and may be towed away at the student's expense More specific details 
:oncerning possession, registration, and parking of automobiles, including a map 
ndicating appropriate parking locations, is given each student at the time of registra- 
ion 

Undergraduate Registration 

Registration for the first term begins in the Registrar's Office, 1 10 Reynolda Hall, at 
>:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 25, and closes at 10 30 a m Registration for the second 
erm begins in the Registrar's Office at 9 00 a.m. on Thursday, lune 30, and closes at 
0:30 a.m. No student is allowed to register after the fifth day of either term 



20 

Graduate Registration 

Graduate students working toward a degree and unclassified graduate students 
taking regular courses offered in the summer session register for the first five-week 
term on May 25 in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School, 210 Reynolda Hall, 
between the hours of 9 00 a m and 10 30 a m Registration for the second five-week 
term is on lune 30 from 9 00 a m to 1030 a m in the Graduate School office Un- 
classified graduate students in the American Foundations Program or other special 
programs register at special times according to instructions from the director of the 
program 



Undergraduate Class Regulations 

Opening of Classes All classes in the first five-week term begin at 100 pm on 
Wednesday, May 25 Science classes in the first five- week term meet for the first time at 
1 00 p m on May 25 and thereafter at the regularly scheduled time of 800 a m to 
1 .00 pm 

In the second five-week term, classes begin at 100 pm on Thursday, lune 30. 
Science classes in the second five-week term meet for the first time at 1 00 p m on lune 
30 and thereafter at the regularly scheduled time of 800 am to 1 00 p m 

Course Changes After registration, necessary course changes must be made im- 
mediately in the Registrar's Office and not later than the fifth day in each term 

Dropping a Course The last day for dropping a class without penalty is May 3 1 in the 
first term and luly 8 in the second term Any course dropped before this date must be 
approved by the Registrar; after this date the drop must be approved by the Dean of the 
Summer Session Except in cases of emergency, the grade in the course is usually 
recorded as F If at any time a student drops any course without prior written approval 
of the Dean, a grade of F for that course is reported by the instructor to the Registrar 

Attendance. Attendance regulations specifically place the responsibility for class 
attendance upon the individual student He or she is expected to attend classes regularly and 
punctually. A student should recognize that one of the most vital aspects of a residential 
college experience is attendance in the classroom and that the value of this academic 
experience cannot fully be measured by tests alone 

Students are considered sufficiently mature to appreciate the necessity of regular 
attendance, to accept this personal responsibility, to demonstrate the kind of self- 
discipline essential for such performance, and to recognize and accept the con- 
sequences of failure to attend An instructor may refer to the Office of the Dean of the 
College for suitable action students who in his or her opinion are causing their work or 
that of the class to suffer because of absence or lateness Any student who does not 
attend classes regularly, or who demonstrates other evidence of academic 
irresponsibility, is subject to such disciplinary action as the Committee on Academic 
Affairs may prescribe, including immediate suspension 

The Office of the Dean of the College maintains a list of students who have been 
absent from class because of illness certified by the Health Service or for other 
extenuating circumstances Such absences are considered excused and a record of 



21 



nem is available to instructors An instructor determines whether work the student 

as missed, including examinations, may be made up 
. Withdrawal from the University. A student who finds it necessary to withdraw must file an 

pplication with the Dean of the Summer Session Before withdrawal in good standing 
'.nay be recorded, the application must be endorsed by the Director of Housing, the 

reasurer, and the Registrar and must be approved by the Dean of the Summer Session 
f a student leaves the College without officially withdrawing, he or she is assigned 
,ailing grades in all current courses and unofficial withdrawal is indicated on the 
ecord 

Auditing of Classes A student enrolled in a full-time program may audit classes 
without charge with the permission of the instructor With the permission of the Dean 
)f the Summer Session and the instructor, others may audit classes at a charge of 
;30.00 per course An auditor is listed on the class roll as such and is sub]ect to the 
lsual attendance regulations and to whatever additional requirements the instructor 
nay impose If these conditions are properly fulfilled, a notation audit" is entered in 
ieu of a grade on the final grade report For the regularly enrolled student, this 
lotation is also entered on the permanent record An auditor may receive no grade or 
credit for the course An audit course may not be changed to a credit course and a 
credit course may not be changed to an audit course 

Grading 

For all courses carrying undergraduate credit there are six grades A (exceptionally 
high achievement), B (superior), C (satisfactory), D (passing but unsatisfactory), E 
(conditional failure), and F (failure) An A has the grade point value of four for each 
credit involved, a B the value of three, a C the value of two, and a D the value of one 

For all courses carrying graduate credit there are three passing grades — A (ex- 
cellent), B (good), and C (low pass) — and one failing grade — F An A has the grade 
point value of three for each semester hour of credit involved, a B the value of two, and 
a C the value of one 

Credits. Undergraduate courses carry four credits each unless otherwise stated Two 
courses for a total of eight credits constitute a normal load in each five-week term 
Teachers and public school administrators enrolled in the Graduate School and 
seeking renewal of the public school certificate may obtain six semester hours credit 
by taking two courses in either term Those with problems should consult the Director 
of Undergraduate Teacher Education 

Grade Reports and Transcripts. Students receive a report which indicates courses taken 
and grades received Those who would I ike a transcript of summer session courses sent 
to another college or university or to the Department of Public Instruction of North 
Carolina should request one from the Registrar's Office 

Honor System 

The honor system is an expression of the concern that students act with honor and 
integrity. It is an integral part of the student government of the College as adopted by 
students and approved by the faculty Its essence is that each student's word can be 



22 



trusted implicitly and that any violation of a student's word is an offense against the 
whole student community The honor system binds students neither to give nor 
receive aid on any examination, quiz, or other pledge work; to have complete respect 
for the property rights of others, not to make false or deceiving statements regarding 
academic matters to another member of the University community; not to give false 
testimony or refuse to pay just debts; and to confront any student who has violated the 
honor system and tell him or her that it is his or her responsibility to report himself or 
herself or face the possibility of being reported to the Honor Council 




23 



Special Programs 



Master of Arts in Education 

t 

The Department of Education offers the Master of Arts in Education degree in the 

■certificate areas of school counseling and School Psychologist II — Psychometrist, in 

the graduate secondary teaching certificate areas of biology, chemistry, English, 

history, mathematics, physical education, physics, and speech, and in all elementary 

certificate teaching areas These programs have been approved by the Board of 

Education of North Carolina as meeting state certificate requirements The program in 

counseling leading to the Master of Arts in Education degree is accredited by the 

National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education The department also 

offers Master of Arts in Education programs in general counseling and in Foundations 

of Education 

A number of assistantships, fellowships, and scholarships are available for qualified 
teachers who wish to enroll as regular students in the term beginning in September 
1983, Assistantships. valued at $10,000, require twelve to fifteen hours per week service 
in the Department of Education Fellowships are valued at $7,300 Scholarships cover 
the cost of tuition Applications for financial assistance should be submitted before 
March 1 

For teachers who cannot attend during the academic year, the residence and course 
requirements for the Masters of Arts in Education degree can be completed principally 
in summer sessions (For degree requirements and courses offered during the summer 
of 1983, consult other sections of this bullet in) Applications for summer scholarships 
are accepted until April 15, 

A graduate bulletin and forms on which to apply for admission and financial 
assistance can be obtained from the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School 

Special Programs for Teachers on Teaching the Gifted 

The Department of Education offers two special terms for public school teachers 
during the summer, focusing on the area of teaching gifted children The first session is 
from lune 20— July 16 and the second session from luly I8-August 13 For details on 
course offerings and class meetings, see the curriculum section of this bulletin. 
Persons desiring additional information should write loseph O Milner, Chairman of 
the Department of Education, 7266 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
27109, or telephone (919) 761-5341 

Special Education Program for High School Science Teachers 

For the first time this summer, the Departments of Biology and Education are 
offering a special program which will lead to the Master of Arts in Education degree 
with a North Carolina Class G teacher's certificate As part of the program, the 
Department of Biology will offer Biology 334, Entomology, and Biology 338, Plant Taxon- 
omy, during a special session, lune 2 0— i u I y 16 Special emphasis will be placed on field 
biology with much of the course work done at the C M Allen Field Station on Belews 



24 

Creek, about twenty-five miles from the campus Transportation will be provided. For 
details on course offerings and class meetings, see the curriculum section of this 
bulletin 

For additional information about the program, write to loseph O Milner, Chairman 
of the Department of Education, 7266 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Caroli- 
na 27109, or telephone (919) 761-5342 

Special Program for Teachers of Advanced Placement English 

The Department of Education is host for a special course, Teaching Advanced Placement 
English, sponsored by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction The course 
will be offered lune 20—1 uly 16, from 1000 to 3.00 daily, and will provide six semester 
hours of graduate credit Teachers should consult LEA sources for financial aid 

For additional information write loseph O, Milner, Chairman of the Department of 
Education, 7266 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27109, or tele- 
phone (919) 761-5342 

Summer Workshop for Teachers of Latin 

A special course, "Workshop In the Teaching of Latin will be offered lune 20-luly 16 for 
secondary school Latin teachers The study of problems and methods and the in- 
troduction of new instructional materials will be combined with an emphasis on the 
literary works of Caesar and Cicero Instruction will be adapted to individual needs 
preparation, and interests Prerequisite is elementary Latin or permission of the 
instructor Interested teachers should consult Christopher P Frost, Department of 
Classical Languages, 7343 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

American Foundations Program in History 

The University and Reynolda House, a museum of American art near the Reynolda 
Campus, have combined resources to offer a program for graduate and undergraduate 
students and teachers of history, art, literature, and music, to be held for the seven- 
teenth consecutive summer at Reynolda House, lune 20— July 29 

Nature and Purpose The approach is interdisciplinary Using the American art collec- 
tion, architecture, literature, music, and the decorative arts, it focuses on the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries The course is designed to be a stimulating 
experience for people who are teaching or who plan to teach in the future, as well as for 
students of history, art, literature, and music From 9 00 to 3.00 daily, students are 
involved in lectures, reading, reflecting, discussion, writing, and individual experi- 
ences such as stone sculpturing and painting A one-week trip to New York enables 
students to visit places of historic, artistic, and literary interest for a comparison with 
and expansion upon local collections 

Scholarships In-service public school teachers in North Carolina are encouraged to 
apply for tuition grants directly to the State Department of Education, Division of Staff 
Development, Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 The University provides students not 
otherwise provided for with an educational scholarship amounting to one half the 



25 

regular summer session tuition A grant from Reynolda House makes it possible for 
each student to receive partial coverage of tours and special activities. 

This year six full scholarships including [ravel allotment to and from Winston-Salem will be given: 
three to students of academic merit and three to teachers with ten years' experience and superior letters of 
recommendation from their immediate supervisor 

Credit. The course provides six semester hours of credit which can be used toward a 
master's degree in history or for certificate renewal Credit is issued by the University, 
■and the course is listed as History 463-464, American Foundations 

Faculty and Administration. Conducting the course are Cyclone Covey, professor of 
history at the University; Barbara Babcock Millhouse, American art lecturer and presi- 
dent of Reynolda House; Doyle Fosso, professor of English at the University. Nicholas 
B. Bragg, director of Reynolda House and program coordinator; Louis R Goldstein, 
assistant professor of music; and other faculty members from the University 

Qualifications for Applicants. The program is designed primarily for students and teach- 
ers, especially those interested in American history, literature, art, and music Teachers 
qualify who hold the BA degree and are seeking certificate renewal or who are working 
toward the MA degree The class is limited to twenty students, not more than five of 
! whom may be recent college graduates or undergraduates. The application deadline is 
May 31. Classes begin on Monday, lune 20. Inquiries should be addressed to the Dean 
of the Summer Session, 7293 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

Historic Preservation Field School 

This summer, the Department of History is offering its first Historic Preservation 
Field School from lune 15 to luly 27, 1983 The course, designated History 381, 382, 
Preservation Practicum, provides from four to eight undergraduate credits or from three to 
six semester hours of graduate work. Training is in the techniques and skills of historic 
preservation and emphasis will vary according to the specific site or sites chosen 
Permission to participate must be obtained from the instructor 

The daily work will consist of lectures and reading assignments to introduce the 
student to historic preservation theory and practice and to the history of the site and 
its locale. Much labor will be necessary to prepare the site for evaluation and to 
accomplish as many preservation and restoration tasks as possible in the time avail- 
able. Preservation skills taught may include identification; preservation planning, 
stabilization, preservation, and restoration techniques; and site interpretation A final 
paper or project will require research in primary and secondary sources and focus on a 
blending of traditional historical methods with the study of material culture Lectures, 
reading, research, tours, site visits, and guest specialists will be coordinated with 
on-site work during the six week term The primary site for summer 1983 is the ruins of 
the Grant-Burrus Hotel, Rockford (Surry County), North Carolina 

Additional information may be obtained from I Edwin Hendricks, Professor of 
History, 7806 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

European Geography Study Tour 

A guided tour of Western Europe to study its physical, economic, social, and cultural 



26 

environments will be offered during the first term of the summer session (May 20-|une 
19. approximate dates) Cities visited include London. Amsterdam, Heidelberg 
Munich. Vienna, Venice, Rome, Florence, and Paris A day will be spent in the Swiss 
Alps An orientation in slides and motion pictures will be provided before the tour The 
course, Education 272, will provide four credits and may be taken on a pass-fail basis, 
or for a letter grade Permission of instructor is prerequisite For additional informa- 
tion write to Herman I Preseren, Professor of Education. 7266 Reynolda Station, 
Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27109 

Interdisciplinary Overseas Research Program 

The Overseas Research Center conducts its sixteenth field project in the Circum- 
Caribbean area May 1 7— July 15 Research will focus on a continuing study and 
documentation of sociocultural change in general and nutrition and health in particu- 
lar The research site will be Saba Island in the Dutch Windward Islands The Center 
offers an interdisciplinary program and is open to any student interested in problems 
facing developing nations Incoming freshmen are invited to participate All applica- 
tions should be received as soon as possible 

For additional information write David K Evans, Associate Professor of Anthropolo- 
gy, 7808 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 (telephone 919-761- 
5495 or 761-5276) 

Archeological Field School in Yadkin County, North Carolina 

The Department of Anthropology will offer two sessions of an archeological field 
school this summer The first will be from May 30— July 8; the second from luly 4-August 
12 The schools will be conducted on a late prehistoric site in Yadkin County, North 
Carolina The work will involve the excavation of prehistoric remains using standard 
methods of archeological recovery In addition to the five day work week, some 
week-end trips to local archeological sites of interest are planned 

The student will receive eight credits in Anthropology 381 and 382 for the six weeks 
work For more information write I Ned Woodall, 7808 Reynolda Station, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina 27109 

Archeological Field School in Hesi 

The Department of Religion of Wake Forest University will participate in the excava- 
tion at Hesi, Israel, I une 1 1 -August 2. 1983 Credit for Religion 31 5 and 3 16 is optional. 
Students interested in this program should consult Fred L. Horton |r , Department of 
Religion, or telephone (919) 761-5460. 

Program in Film History and Film Production 

The Department of Speech Communication and Theatre Arts will offer a program, 
May 25-|une 28, in Film History and Film Production Students may enroll for a course, 
Introduction to Film, which provides background on the history of the film industry and 
offers the opportunity to see film classics by directors D W Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, 



27 

Frank Capra, lohn Ford, Orson Welles, Ingmar Bergman, and others The course pro- 
vides four credits. Students may also enroll in a course entitled Film Production (two 
credits) in which they will have the opportunity to write and produce an original color 
film, involving all aspects of filmmaking: camera operation, sound, lighting, editing, 
and mixing The two courses are offered as a sequence at 10 50-12:05 and 12:15- 
1:30, or they may be taken independently 

For additional information, consult lulian C Burroughs, Professor of Speech Com- 
munication and Theatre Arts, 7347 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
27109 (telephone: 919-761-5406) 



American College of Sports Medicine Workshops 

The American College of Sports Medicine will sponsor a preventive/rehabilitative 
exercise technologist workshop and an exercise test technologist certification session 
during the first term of the 1983 summer session The workshop is lune 20-29 and the 
certification session is lune 30— luly 1. 

Inquiries should be addressed to Paul M Ribisl, Director of American College of 
Sports Medicine Workshop, 7234 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
27109. 



Marching Band Workshop 

A special workshop in corps style marching band techniques, sponsored by Duncan 
Music Company and the Demon Deacons Marching Band, will be offered lune 10-1 1, 
1983. 

One unit of renewal credit will be offered to music educators Inquiries should be 
addressed to Martin Province, Director of Bands, 7345 Reynolda Station, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina 27109 



Debate Workshops for High School Students and Coaches 

The University invites superior high school students with an interest in forensics to 
participate in a debate workshop to be held on campus lune 27-1 uly 15 Students live in 
University residence halls under the supervision of the workshop staff Nationally 
recognized authorities in debate theory serve in the distinguished lecturer series; an 
instructional staff from throughout the country works individually with students The 
recreational facilities of the University are available for all participants Students who 
have completed the ninth grade may apply 

Acoaches' workshop will be held lune 27— July 1 Graduate credit will be available to 
participants 

Interested students and teachers should consult David Williams, Department of 
Speech Communication and Theatre Arts, 7347 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina 27109 



28 

Boys' State Program in Citizenship 
for High School Students 

In cooperation with the American Legion, the University sponsors North Carolina 
Boys' State, a program to provide training in American government and citizenship 

The program begins on lune 12 and extends through lune 18 Approximately 475 
boys attend. Applicants must have a B average and must have given evidence of 
leadership in high school Participants have all expenses paid and are selected by the 
American Legion in conjunction with local high school officials. 

Inquiries should be addressed to the Adjutant of the North Carolina Department of 
the American Legion, Box 26657, Raleigh, North Carolina 2761 1, or to lack D. Fleer, 
Professor of Politics, 7568 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

Wake Forest University Cheerleaders Camp 

The Third Wake Forest Cheerleaders Camp will offer two one-week (Sunday- 
Thursday) sessions, luly 10-14 and July 17-21 Camps are limited to 200 participants 
each week The camp is open to students eight years of age through senior high school. 
All of the staff are or have been varsity cheerleaders at Wake Forest University or 
another ACC school and have taught at one of the national cheerleading camps For 
additional information, write Anne Bingham, Director, Cheerleaders Camp, 7265 
Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109, ortelephone (919) 761-5626. 

Summer Golf Program 

Thelesse Haddock Summer Golf Program, first offered in 1979, is available again this 
year. The program is under the supervision of Coach lesse Haddock, and members of 
the Wake Forest University golf team will be counselors. Golfers are divided into small 
groups according to age and ability Off- and on-the-course instruction includes 
lectures, exhibitions, films, and games. Golf courses at Bermuda Run Country Club, 
home of the Wake Forest golf team, and at Tanglewood, site of the 1974 PGA Cham- 
pionship, will be the scenes of play 

Four sessions are available in 1983: first session, June 1 9— July 2 ; second session, luly 
4-16; third session, luly 1 0— luly 23; Super Session, luly 4— luly 23 The Super Session 
will include a more concentrated exposure to members of the PGA Tour and a trip to 
Pinehurst, North Carolina, "the golf capital of the world." Also for 1983, campers may 
attend any single week during the first and second sessions Participants must be 
eighteen years of age or younger. Enrollment is limited For additional information, 
write lesse Haddock, Inc., Wake Forest University, 6696 Reynolda Station, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina 27109 or call (919) 761-5619 

Basketball Camp 

The University basketball coaching staff conducts basketball camps for young peo- 
ple age eight to eighteen The camp includes two sessions for boys, the first, lune 
19-24; and the second, lune 26— July 1 Enrollment in each is limited Head Coach Carl 
Tacy and Assistant Coaches Mark Freidinger, Ernie Nestor, and Herb Krusen are in 



29 



charge and in attendance at every session The coaches are assisted by outstanding 
professionals and college players. Inquiries should be addressed to 7506 Reynolda 
Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

The Lady Deacon Basketball Camp, conducted by Coach Wanda Briley, will also 
sponsor two sessions. The first, from July 10-15, is open to girls age eight to eighteen. 
The advanced session, held from luly I 7-22, is open to high school juniors and seniors 
For more information, call Wanda Briley at (919) 761-5763. 

All campers live in residence halls on campus and thier meals are provided in the 
University cafeteria. Instruction is given on the four gymnasium courts. 

Sports Camp 

The Department of Physical Education will sponsor a sports camp for boys and girls 
eight through fifteen. The camp, in its twenty-third year, meets Monday-Friday morn- 
ings from 8:30 until 12:15. Two sessions of the camp are scheduled: lune 1 3-1 une 24 
and lune 27— July 8. Leo Ellison, professor of physical education, serves as director of 
the Sports Camp and is assisted by other members of the faculty Instruction is given in 
a wide variety of sports. Inquiries should be addressed to the Department of Physical 
Education, 7234 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 







30 

Courses of Instruction 

Courses numbered 100-200 are primarily for freshmen, 200-300 primarily for sophomores, 
300-400 primarily for juniors, seniors, and graduate students, and 400-500 for graduate students. 

Credits for undergraduates and semester hours of credit for graduate students are shown by 
numerals immediately after the course title — for example, (4) or (3). To translate credits into hours, a 
four-credit course is assigned 3.6 semester hours Some laboratory courses have numerals after course 
descriptions to show the number of hours per week normally spent in the laboratory — for example. 
[Lab — three hours). The symbol P — followed by course numbers or titles shows prerequisites for the 
course 

A normal load is two courses, or eight undergraduate credits, in each five-week term. Undergraduate 
courses normally carry four credits each and graduate courses three semester hours of credit each. 

Unless otherwise indicated, classes for all courses except laboratory science courses meet daily 
Monday through Friday, and on the first, third, and fifth Saturdays in the first term, and on the second 
Saturday (lulu 10) in the second term for periods of seventy-five minutes each Science lecture and 
laboratory courses meet from 800 a.m. to 1 00 p.m. on the dates indicated above in each term 

Although such occurrences are rare, the University reserves the right not to offer courses in the 
summer session for which there is insufficient registration, to modify, withdraw, or make substitutions 
for any course, and to change the instructor for any course indicated in this bulletin. The schedule 
supplement available at registration should be consulted for changes Location of classes will also be 
indicated on the supplement 



Anthropology 

151. General Anthropology I. Archeology and Human Evolution. (4) Origin and 
evolution of humans with a focus on human biological and sociocultural change 
during the Plio-Pleistocene (Credit will not be granted for both Anthropology 151 and 
Anthropology 162.) 

Second Term 10 50-12:05 Evans 

152. General Anthropology II. Cultural Anthropology. (4) Across-cultural analysis of 
human institutions with a survey of major theories, explaining cultural variety and 
human nature (Credit will not be granted for both Anthropology 1 52 and Anthropology 
341 ) 

First Term 1050-1205 Tefft 

381, 382. Archeological Research. (4,4) The recovery of anthropological data through 
the use of archeology, taught in the excavation and interpretation of a prehistoric site 
P — Anthropology 151 and permission of instructor or Anthropology 162 (See special 
programs ) 

Special Term May 30-|uly 8 Robertson 

Special Term luly 4-August 12 Woodall 

383, 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology. (4 4) Training in techniques for 
study of foreign cultures, carried out in the field P — Anthropology 1 5 1 , or 1 52, or 162 
(See special programs.) Evans 

Special Term/May I7-iune 15 



31 



Art 

111. Introduction to Drawing and Design. (4) Introduction to the basic elements of 
two-dimensional and three-dimensional design, to include drawing, painting, and 
sculpture Six class hours per week 
First Term/9:25-l 1 55 daily Sutherland 

Biology 

111. Biological Principles. (5) Fundamental principles and concepts in biology (Five 

credits or four semester hours) 

Lecture 800-900 and 12 00-1 00 daily 

Laboratory 9:00-12 00 daily 

First Term Amen 

150. Organismic Biology. (5) Morphology and phylogeny of plants and animals (Five 

credits or four semester hours) P — Biology 1 1 1 or permission of instructor 

Lecture 800-900 and 1 2 00-1 00 daily 

Laboratory 9 00-12 00 daily 

Second Term Lane 

334. Entomology. (5) A study of insects, with emphasis on structure, development, 
taxonomy, and phylogeny (Five credits or four semester hours ) 
Special Term/June 20— July 16,8 00-400 Tuesday, Thursday Olive 

(See special programs ) 

338. Plant Taxonomy. (5) A study of the classification of seed plants, with emphasis 
on a comparative study of orders and families (Five credits or four semester hours ) 
Special Termlune 20-luly 16/8:00-4:00 Monday, Wednesday Wyatt 

(See special programs ) 

391, 392, 393, 394. Special Problems in Biology. (2,2,2,2) independent library and 
laboratory investigation carried out under the supervision of a member of the staff: 
393, 394 not to be counted toward the major P — Permission of instructor 
First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

411, 412. Directed Study in Biology. (1,1) Reading and/or laboratory problems 

carried out under the supervision of a faculty member P — Permission of instructor 
First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) 

591, 592. Dissertation Research. (Hours to be determined ) 

Business and Accountancy 

Business 

201. Business Statistics. (4) Techniques of analysis of numerical data, including 
descriptive statistics, sampling theory, statistical inference, correlation and 



32 



regression, and non-parametric statistics 

First Term/1 0:50-1 2:05 Akinc 

202. Quantitative Analysis. (4) Development and understanding of quantitative 
decision tools and models to be applied to the managerial decision process Models 
include linear programming (graphic, algebraic, and simplex solutions; sensitivity 
analysis, duality; transportation and assignment algorithm), decision theory, PERT/ 
CPM; and queuing P — Business 201 
Second Term 1050-12 05 Ewing 

221 . Principles of Marketing. (4) A study of the role of marketing in business and the 
economy Emphasis is on the examination of marketing concepts, functions, in- 
stitutions, methods, and consumer problems P — Economics 151 and 152 
Second Term.'925-l 40 Yu 

231. Principles of Finance. (4) An introduction to the field of finance including 
financial management, investment analysis, and financial institutions and markets 
Emphasis is placed on financial management at the level of the business entity or 
non-profit organization P — Accounting 1 12 and Economics 151 and 152 
First Term-925-10 40 Roberts 

Accountancy 

111. Accounting Principles 1.(4) The basic accounting process and underlying princi- 
ples pertaining to the preparation and interpretation of published financial state- 
ments. 

First Term 9.25-10 40 Cook 

1 12. Accounting Principles II. (4) A continuation of Accounting 1 I 1 and an introduc- 
tion to management accounting. P — Accounting 1 I I 

Second Term/1 0:50-1 2:05 Tower 

151. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A detailed analysis of theory and related problems 
for typical accounts in published financial statements P — Accountancy 1 12 

First Term 9.25-10:40 Hylton 

152. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A continuation of Accountancy 151 P — 
Accountancy 151 

Second Term 925-1040 Hylton 



Chemistry 

111. College Chemistry. (5) Fundamental chemical principles. Laboratory covers 

experimental aspects of basic concepts (Five credits or four semester hours) 

Lecture 800-1000 daily 

Laboratory 10 00-1 00 daily 

First Term Nowell 



33 

112. College Chemistry. (5) Fundamental chemical principles A continuation of 

Chemistry 111 Laboratory covers experimental aspects of basic concepts P — 

Chemistry 111. (Five credits or four semester hours) 

Lecture 8:00-10:00 daily 

Laboratory 10:00-1:00 daily 

Second Term Gross 

301, 302. Elective Research. (0,0) 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

391, 392. Undergraduate Research. (2 2) 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) Staff 

591, 592. Dissertation Research. (Hours arranged) Staff 



Classics 

253. Greek Epic Poetry. (4) Oral epic poetry, with primary emphasis on the Iliad and 

the Odyssey of Homer and the later development of the genre A knowledge of the Greek 

language is not required Satisfies a Division I requirement 

First Term/10:50-12:05 Rowland 



Computer Science 

{See courses listed in Mathematics and Physics sections of this bulletin 



Economics 

151. Principles of Economics. (4) A study of individual economic units in a market 
economy, with some attention to monopoly, labor unions, and poverty 

First Term/9:25-10:40 D Hammond 

First Term/10:50-12:05 Hydell 

152. Principles of Economics. (4) Attention is focused on the functioning of the 
economy as a whole, with particular reference to employment, inflation, economic 
growth, and policy P — Economics 151 

Second Term/9: 2 5- 10:40 Elavia 

Second Term/1 2: 15-1:30 Elavia 

202. Macroeconomic Theory. (4) A study of Keynesian and post-Keynesian theories 
about the determination of the level of national income, employment, and economic 
growth, P— Economics 151, 152 
First Term/9:25-10:40 Hydell 



54 



Education 

201. Foundations of Education. (4) Philosophical, historical, and sociological foun- 
dations of education, including analysis of contemporary issues and problems 
First Term 9:25-10 40 Reeves 

211. Educational Psychology. |4) General principles of adolescent development The 
nature, theories, processes, and conditions of effective teaching and learning. Apprais- 
ing and directing learning 
First Term/1 0:50-1 2:05 Litcher 

271. Introduction to Geography. (4) A study of the physical environment and its 
relationship to man, including an examination of climate, vegetation, soils, water 
resources, and land forms found in various regions of the world 

Second Term 12 15-1 30 Preseren 

272. Geography Study Tour. (4) A guided tour to selected areas in Europe to study 
physical, economic, and cultural environments and their influence on man. Back- 
ground references for reading are suggested prior to the tour (See special programs ) 
First Term May 20-|une 19 (approximate dates) Preseren 

341. Principles of Counseling and Guidance. (4) Counseling history, philosophy, 
theory, procedure, and process Therapeutic and development counseling approaches 
in guidance and personnel work in educational, social, business, and community 
service agencies 
First Term/9:25-l 0:40 Elmore 

442. Group Procedures in Counseling. (3) An experiential and conceptual explora- 
tion of the psychological dynamics and interpersonal communication of small groups, 
including the purpose and process of various group procedures such as group guid- 
ance, group counseling, T-groups, encounter groups, sensitivity training, psycho- 
drama, and sensory awareness techniques P — Education 341 or 441 and permission of 
instructor 
Second Term 9 25-10 40 Branscomb 

445. Counseling Practicum and Internship. (3-6) Observation of counseling, case 
study procedures, analysis of tape recorded interviews, and role playing, supervised 
counseling experience 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

463. Seminar in Counseling. |3) P — Permission of instructor 

First Term 800-915 Elmore 

483. Readingsand Research in Education. ( 1 ,2, or 3) Independent study and research 
on topics relevant to the students field of concentration The course may include a 
special reading program not covered by other courses or a special research project- 
Supervision by a faculty member Hours of credit to be determined prior to registra- 
tion 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 



35 
491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) 

The following education courses are offered during special terms and hours 

Special Term I, June 20-July 16 

Note. Teachers interested in a graduate program in Biology should see Special Programs section and 
courses listed under Biology in the curriculum section of this bulletin 

390. Education of Exceptional Persons. (4) A survey of the types of exceptionality 
Emphasis will be placed on characteristics, identification, educational programming, 
management, and evaluation 

Special Term/9 00-10 40 Litcher 

481. Methodology and Research (Intermediate). (3) Advanced study of the methods 
and materials of a specific discipline in the curriculum (English, social studies, 
mathematics, science) with special attention directed to the basic research in the 
discipline 

Special Term/1050-1 2.30 Shelton 

482. Teaching Advanced Placement English. (6) An investigation of the content and 
the pedagogy appropriate to advanced placement courses in English 

Special Term 1000-3 00 daily Reising 

483. Readings and Research in Education. (1,2, or 3) Independent study and re- 
search on topics relevant to the student's field of concentration The course may 
include a special reading program in an area not covered by other courses or a special 
research project Supervision by faculty member Hours of credit to be determined 
prior to registration 

Special Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Special Term II, July 18-August 13 

301. Audiovisual Education. (4) Introduction to the field of audiovisual education, 
development and application of ski lis in the use of instructional materials, equipment, 
and programs 
Special Terrrv9:00-10:40 Smith 

391. Teaching the Gifted. (4) A general investigation of theory and practice which has 
special meaning for teachers of the gifted The course of study includes an examination 
of general curriculum matters such as classroom styles, learning modes, epistemologi- 
cal theories, developmental constructs, and psychosociological patterns which have 
special pertinence to the teacher of the gifted 

Special Term/3 40-520 Milner 

394. Internship in Education of the Gifted. (4) An intensive period of observation and 

instruction of gifted students Readings and directed reflection upon the classroom 

experience will be used to develop a richer understanding of such a special school 

setting 

Special Term Hours arranged Miiner 

443. Vocational Psychology. (3) Vocational development through the life span, 



36 

psychological aspects of work; occupational structure and the classification of occupa- 
tional literature, theories of vocational choice and their implications for vocational 
counseling. 
Second Term. 10:50-12:30 Adams 

483. Readings and Research in Education. (1,2. or 3| Independent study and re- 
search on topics relevant to the student's field of concentration The course may 
include a special reading program in an area not covered by other courses or a special 
research project Supervision by a faculty member Hours of credit to be determined 
prior to registration 
Special Term/Hours arranged Staff 



English 

160. Survey of Major British Writers. (4) Eight to ten writers representing different 
periods and genres: primarily lecture 

First Term/9: 25- 1040 Maine 

Second Term 925-1040 Cotton 

170. Survey of Major American Writers. (4) Nine to eleven writers representing 

different periods and genres, primarily lecture 

First Term/1 0:50-1 2:05 DeShazer 

375S. American Naturalism. (4,3) An examination of the naturalist movement in late 
nineteenth century American fiction Writers to be studied include Howells, Wharton, 
Crane, Norris, and Dreiser. 
First Term,- 1050-12:05 Reynolds 

382. Modern American Fiction, 191 5 to the Present. (4,3) To include such writers as 
Lewis, Hemingway. Fitzgerald, Faulkner. Steinbeck, Wolfe, Wright, Katherine Anne 
Porter, Mailer, Bellow, Malamud, Flannery O'Conner, Baldwin, and Styron. 
Second Term 1050-12 05 Maine 

405S. Emerson and Thoreau. (3) A study of the essays and poems of Ralph Waldo 
Emerson and the prose of Henry David Thoreau, with attention to both thought and 
style and to the relationships between the two writers, some consideration of current 
critical attitudes Lectures, reports, discussion, and a critical paper 
First Term 9:25-10 40 (If any public school teachers enroll, course will be offered at 
4:15 p.m. until the public school term ends.) Moss 

415. Studies in Chaucer. (3) Emphasis on selected Canterbury Tales, Jroilusand Criseyde, 
and the longer minor works, with attention to social, critical, and intellectual back- 
ground Lectures, reports, discussion, and a critical paper 
Second Term 9:25-10 40 Shorter 

Not?: For course, Teaching Advanced Placement English, see Education in the curriculum 
section of this bulletin 



37 

French 

153. Intermediate French. (5) A review of grammar and composition with practice in 
conversation. Reading of selected texts Class meets daily for two periods Lab re- 
quired- P — French 112, 1 13, or two years of high school French 
First Term/9:25-IO,40 and 1215-1:30 Margitic 

214. Masterpieces of French Literature 11. (4) Reading of selected texts in French 
Particular periods, genres, and authors may vary from summer to summer Parallel 
reading and reports. Satisfies either the basic or the divisional requirement Only one 
course in masterpieces may count toward the major P — French 153 or equivalent. 
Second Term/9:25-10 40 Carrasco 

History 

101. The Rise of the West. (4) A survey of ancient, medieval, and early modern history 
to 1700. 

First Term/10 50-12:05 Barefield 

102. Europe and the World in the Modern Era. (4) A survey of modern Europe from 
1700 to the present 

,'Second Term 1050-1205 Sinclair 

152. The United States since 1865. (4) Political, social, economic, and intellectual 

aspects. 

First Term/1 2: 15-1:30 Smiley 

342. The Middle East from Sulieman the Magnificent to the Present. (4) Major 
subjects covered are the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs and Persians 
under Ottoman hegemony, the rise of Arab nationalism, and the emergence of the 
modern Arab states and their role in the post-World War II era 
First Term/9: 2 5- 10:40 Gokhale 

360. The United States since Pearl Harbor. (4) Trends and changes in the nation 

from World War II through the Kennedy era to the present 

Second Term/9:25- 10:40 Smith 

381S,382S. Preservation Practicum. (4,4, 3,3) Training in the techniques and skills of 
historic preservation Emphasis will vary according to the specific site or sites in- 
volved. Usually offered in the summer P — Permission of the instructor (See special 
programs ) 
Second Term/Hours arranged Hendricks 

'398. Individual Study. (4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in the 
department, permitted upon departmental approval of petition presented by a quali- 
fied student 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

399. Directed Reading. (1-4) 

First Term'Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 



38 

463S, 464S. American Foundations. (6) A survey of the European heritage and 
colonial environment which developed into the American culture of the late eigh- 
teenth and nineteenth centuries A cooperative program of the University and Reynol- 
da House involving the staffs of both institutions Lectures provide a continuity of 
theme; Old Salem and other historic sites provide opportunities for giving history a 
visual dimension A research project is required Primarily for teachers, scholarships 
available (See special programs ) 
lune 20—1 u ly 29 Hours arranged Bragg, Covey, Millhouse 

481, 482. Directed Reading. (3,3) 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) 

Humanities 

216. Romance Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in translation 
from Romance literature Satisfies a Division I requirement 

Second Term 10:50-12:05 

217. European Drama. (4) A study of selected works in translation, from the seven- 
teenth to the twentieth centuries, by major continental dramatists Satisfies a Division 
I requirement 

First Term 9 -25-10:50 O'Flaherty 

253. Greek Epic Poetry. (4) Oral epic poetry, with primary emphasis on the Iliad and 
the Odyssey of Homer and the later development of the genre Satisfies a Division I 
requirement A knowledge of the Greek language is not required 
First Term/1050-1205 Rowland 

Latin 

274S. Workshop in the Teaching of Latin: Caesar and Cicero. (4) Background, 

readings, and methodology for the second and third years of high school Latin 
Instruction will be adapted to individual needs, preparation, and interests Prerequi- 
site: Elementary Latin or permission of instructor 
Special Term, lune 20— lu ly 16/Hours arranged Frost 

Mathematics 

Computer Science 

173. Introduction to Computer Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory A first 
course in structured programming, problem solving, and coding in a high level pro- 
gramming language 

First Term 1050-1205 Graham May 

Second Term 10 50-12 05 Hayashi 

175. COBOL Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory A study of the elements of 



39 



COBOL language P — Computer Science 171 or 173 

First Term/1 0:50-1 2-.05 lohn 

Mathematics 

The following courses can be used as credit toward basic requirements in Division II: Mathematics 
107, 108, 111, 112, and 157. 

107. Finite Mathematics. (4) Probability and statistics, matrices, linear programming. 
Markov chains, and theory of games. Laboratory two hours 

First Term/925-1040 Gentry 

108. Essential Calculus. (4) A one-semester course in differential and integral calcu- 
lus, with application to business and the social sciences (Credit not allowed for both 
108 and 111.) Laboratory two hours 

Second Term 925-1040 Staff 

111. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I. (5) Differential and integral calculus and the 
basic concepts of analytic geometry (Credit not allowed for both 108 and Ml ) 
Laboratory two hours 

First Term/8 00-9: 1 5 Carmichael 

1 12. Calculus with Analytic Geometry II. (4) Continuation of topics in Mathematics 
111. Laboratory two hours 

Second Term/8:00-915 Carmichael 

157. Elementary Probability and Statistics. (4) Probability and distribution func- 
tions, means and variances, and sampling distributions (Credit not allowed for both 
156 and 157 No credit after this course for Sociology 380 ) Laboratory two hours 
First Term/9. 25-10 40 Gaylord May 

381. Individual Study. (2,3,or 4) A choice of study in an area of individual interest, to 
be directed by a faculty adviser, by pre-arrangement 

First Term, Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3 3) 

Military Science 

202S. Combined Military Fundamentals. (4) History and organization of the United 
States Army Basic and intermediate military skills to include leadership styles and 
techniques, land navigation, dismounted drill, mountaineering, and marksmanship. 
Class time will bel45-3 45pm, five days per week with one weekend overnight field 
trip. {Offered in the summer onlu A minimum of six students must enroll for class to be 
offered.) Not available to students who have taken more than one military fun- 
damentals course. 
First Term/I 45-345 daily Brewer and Pope 

Music 
101. Introduction to the Language of Music. (3,4) Basic theoretical concepts and 



40 

musical terminology Survey of musical styles, composers, and selected works from the 
Middle Ages through the twentieth century For students not majoring in music Meets 
Division I requirement 
First Term 12.15-1 30 Locklair 

290S. Marching Band Techniques. (1) 

lune 10-1 1 Hours arranged Province 

Philosophy 

111. Basic Problems of Philosophy. (4) An examination of the basic concepts of 
several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowl- 
edge, man, God, mind, and matter 

First Term/1 0:50-1 2:05 Hestei 

Second Term 925-1040 Pritchard 

Second Term 1050-1 205 Kennedy 

171. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4) A critical survey of religious and 
philosophical ideas in the Western world from antiquity to modern times. Satisfies the 
philosophy or religion requirement in Division 111 Choice determined at registration. 
First Term/9:25-l 0:40 Angell 

Physical Education 

310. Applied Field Study. (2) A course involving application and methods of solving 
problems in a specialized area, according to the student's immediate career goals. 
P — Physical Education 251 or permission of the instructor. 

First Term Hours arranged Hottinger 

Second Term Hours arranged Hottinger 

382. Independent Study in Health and Physical Education. 1 1-4) 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

482. Independent Study in Health and Physical Education. ( 1-4) 
First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

Physics 

111. Introductory Physics. (5) A basic course for freshmen and sophomores, including 
the elements of mechanics, properties of matter, wave motion, sound, heat, electricity 
and magnetism, light, and some of the recent developments in physics Lecture two 
hours daily Laboratory two hours, Monday through Friday (Five credits or four 
semester hours) 
First Term 8 00-12 30 Staff 

I 12. Introductory Physics. (5) A continuation of Physics 1 1 1 Lecture two hours daily. 
Laboratory two hours. Monday through Friday (Five credits or four semester hours) 
Second Term 8 00-12:30 Matthews 

130. Introduction to Microcomputers. (4) A study of microcomputer hardware, in- 
terfacing, and peripherals, and an introduction to BASIC and assemblymachine 



II 



anguage programming. Special attention is paid to the needs of classroom teachers in 
he summer session. Prospective students must consult the instructor, George E. 
Aatthews Jr., at (919) 761-5340, prior to registration 
irst Term/3 -.30-5:00 MTWT Matthews 

91, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) Staff 

Politics 

13. The American Political Order. (4) This course is an examination of the American 
political system through a study of its basic political documents, its institutions, and 
ts current values Beginning with a reading of Tocqueville's Democracy in America, the 
:ourse will explore the problems inherent in a democratic order, the institutional 
eatures supporting a republican form of government, and the relationship between 
he political order and the literature, arts, and popular media 

'irst Term/8 00-915 Broyles 

14. Comparing Political Systems. (4) The course is concerned with understanding 
,ome of the differences in political form, style, and ideology found in diverse twen- 
ieth-century societies such as those of revolutionary socialist regimes (Cuba), mod- 
ern oligarchies (the Soviet Union), liberal democracies (Great Britain), and others 
: irst Term 10 50-12 05 Reinhardt 

Psychology 

51 . Introductory Psychology. (4) A systematic survey of psychology as the scientific 
tudy of behavior Prerequisite to all other courses in psychology 
'irst Term 800-915 I E Williams 

irst Term/12 1 5-1 30 Best 

>econd Term 12 15-1 30 I G Williams 

!39. Altered States of Consciousness. (4) Examination of altered states of conscious- 
less with special reference to sleep and dreams, meditation, hypnosis, and drugs 
1 — Psychology 1 5 1 
Second Term 10.50-12 05 Beck 

!41. Developmental Psychology. (4) A survey of physical, emotional, cognitive, and 

ocial development in humans from conception to death P — Psychology 151 

irst Term/12: 15-1 30 Edwards 

'.60. Social Psychology. (4) A survey of the field, including theories of social behavior. 

nterpersonal attraction, attitudes and attitude change, and group behavior 

' — Psychology I 51 

'irst Term 9 25-10 40 Burger 

!65. Human Sexuality: A Changing Scene. (4) An exploration of the physiological 

ind psychological aspects of human sexuality, with attention to changing sexual 

nores, sexual deviances, sexual dysfunction, and sex-related roles P — Psychology 

51. 

Second Term 9 25-10 40 Burger 



42 

268. Psychology of Business and Industry. (4) Psychological principles and methods 

applied to problems commonly encountered in business and industry P — Psychology 

151 

Second Term 1 2 15-1 30 Hoyle 

280. Directed Study. (1-4) 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term/Hours arranged Staff 

335. Fundamentals of Human Motivation. (4) Description and analysis of fun- 
damental motivational phenomena, with special reference to human problems, in- 
cluding reward and punishment, conflict, anxiety, affection, needs for achievement and 
power, aggression, creativity, and curiosity P — Psychology 151 
First Term/ 10: 50- 12:05 Beck 

344. Abnormal Psychology. (4) Descriptive analysis of the major types of abnormal 
behavior, with focus on organic, psychological, and cultural causes and major modes 
of therapy P — Psychology 151 
Second Term 800-9 15 Schubert 

358. Psychology of Woman. (4) The course has two principal objectives: to provide 
students with a better understanding of the behavior of women by reviewing and 
analyzing research and theory, and to stimulate students to assess theirown attitudes 
and beliefs The course atmosphere is informal but research-oriented The major 
content areas include biological and evolutionary issues, sex similarities and differ- 
ences, and motivational issues unique to women P — Psychology 151 
First Term 8 00-9 15 lourdan 

482. Readi.igs and Research in Psychology. (1,2 or 3) 

First Term/Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492, Thesis Research. (1-3 1-3) Staff 

Religion 

111. Introduction to the Old Testament. (4) A survey of the Old Testament designed 
to introduce the student to the history, literature, and religion of the ancient Hebrews 
Second Term 8:00-9 1 5 Hamrick 

161. World Religions. (4) The place of religion in life and the origin, nature, and 
accomplishments of the living religions of the world, studies from the historical point 
of view 
First Term 8 00-9 15 Collins 

171. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4) A critical survey of religion and 
philosophy in the Western world from antiquity to modern times Satisfies the philoso- 
phy or religion requirement in Division III Choice determined at registration 
First Term 9 25-1040 Angell 

286, 287. Directed Reading. ( 1-4, 1-4) A project in an area of study not otherwise 



1 










43 


Available in the department, perm 
iresented by a qualified student. 
irst Term/Hours arranged 

Second Term/Hours arranged 


tted upon departmental app 


roval of 


a petition 

Staff 
Staff 


ill 5, 316. Field Research in 

Culture of the ancient Near 
ancient site. 
( une 1 1-August 2 


Biblical Archeology. (4,4) A study 
East through the excavation and i 


of the religion and 
"iterpretation of an 

Horton 


101, 402. Directed Reading 


• (3,3) 








Staff 


191, 492. Thesis Research. 


(3,3) 


Sociology 






Staff 



151. Principles of Sociology. (4) General introduction to the field social organization 
'ind disorganization, socialization, culture, social change, and other aspects 
first Term/9:25-l 0:40 Pearson 

Second Term/9: 2 5- 10:40 Gulley 

'248. Marriage and the Family. (4) The social basis of the family, emphasizing the 
problems growing out of modern conditions and social change 
Second Term/10:50-12:05 Earle 

$42. juvenile Delinquency. (4) The nature and extent of juvenile delinquency; an 
examination of prevention, control, and treatment programs P — Sociology 151 and 
permission of instructor. 
Second Term/9:25-l 0:40 Bechtel 

Spanish 

1 12. Elementary Spanish II. (4) A course for beginners covering grammar essentials 
and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elementary texts P — Spanish 
1 1 1 or equivalent. Lab required. 
First Term/9:25-1 0:40 Newton 

153. Intermediate Spanish. (5) A review of gram ma rand composition, with practice in 

conversation. Reading of selected texts Class meets daily for two periods, with 

Dne-half hour of laboratory time P — Spanish 112, I 13, or two years of high school 

Spanish. 

First Term/8:00-9: 15 and 1050-12:05 Bueno 

214S. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. (4) Selected readings in Spanish and 
Spanish American literature Designed as a substitute for either Spanish 215 or 216 
P — Spanish 153 or equivalent 
Second Term/9: 25-1 040 Martin 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 

121. Introduction to Theatre. (4) A survey of all areas of theatre arts Experience in 
laboratory and University Theatre productions (May be used to satisfy a requirement 



44 

in Division 1 ) Laboratory — three hours. 

First Term ■9:25-10:40 Staff 

Second Term, '9:25-10:40 Staff 

151. Public Speaking I. (4) A study of the nature and fundamentals of speech 
communication Practice in the preparation and delivery of short speeches 
Second Term 8 00-915 Hill 

1 53. Interpersonal Communication. (4) The course is divided into three parts: com- 
munication theory, person-to-person communication, and small group interaction 
First Term'1050-12 05 Warren 

156. Oral Interpretation of Literature. (4) Fundamentals of reading aloud, with 

emphasis on selection, analysis, and performance 

First Term/1 2: 15-1:30 Shirley 

161. Voice and Diction. (4) A study of the principles of voice production, with 

emphasis on phonetics as a basis for correct sound formation 

First Term/'925-l 040 Shirley 

245. Introduction to Film. (4) Historical introduction to motion pictures through the 
study of various kinds of films and their relationship to society 

First Term/10:50-I 2:05 (See special programs ) Burroughs 

246. Film Production. (2) A study of the basic elements of motion picture production 
Each student is responsible for making a film 

First Term/1 2: 15-1:30 (See special programs .) Burroughs 

282. Individual Study. (4) Special research and readings in a choice of interest to be 
approved and supervised by a faculty adviser 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours Arranged Staff 

283B. Radio Practicum I. (2) Individual proiects: includes organizational meetings, 
faculty supervision, and faculty evaluation (No student may enroll for more than two 
credits per term | Pass Fail only 

First Term'Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

355S. Directing the Forensics Program. ( 1 ) A pragmatic study of the methods of 
directing high school and college forensics with work in the High School Debate 
Workshop. Offered in the summer only (See special programs ) 
Special Term Hours arranged Hill 

481 , 482. Readings and Research in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. (3) 

First Term Hours arranged Staff 

Second Term Hours arranged Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. (3,3) Staff 



The Administration 



45 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. 



ames R. Scales (1967) 

BA, Oklahoma Baptist, MA, PhD, Oklahoma, LittD, Northern Michigan; 
LLD, Alderson-Broaddus, LLD, Duke, LittD, Belmont Abbey 



:dwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) 

BA, Wake Forest. AM, PhD, Harvard 

Sanson Meads (1947, 1963) 

BA, California, MD, ScD, Temple 

ohn G Williard (1958) 

BS, North Carolina (Chapel Hill), CPA, North Carolina 

3, William loyner |r. (1969) 
BA, Wake Forest 



President 



Provost 



Russell H, Brantley |r. 
BA, Wake Forest 



1953) 



-homas E, Mullen (1957) 

BA, Rollins, MA, PhD, Emory 

Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) 

BS, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Duke 

ohn D, Scarlett (1955, 1979) 
BA, Catawba, ID, Harvard 

Robert W Shively (1982) 

BA, Colgate; MEd, Harvard; PhD, Cornell 

Richard Janeway (1966) 

BA, Colgate; MD, Pennsylvania 

Thomas C. Taylor (1971) 

BS, MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill), 
PhD, Louisiana State, CPA, North Carolina 

Percival Perry (1939, 1947) 

BA, Wake Forest, MA, Rutgers; PhD, Duke 

David Allen Hills (1960) 

BA, Kansas, MA, PhD, Iowa 

Mark H. Reece (1956) 
BS, Wake Forest 

Lula M, Leake (1964) 

BA, Louisiana State; MRE, Southern Baptist Seminary 

Edward R, Cunnings (1974) 
BSM, MEd, St Lawrence 



Michael Ford (1981) 

BA, Wake Forest, MDiv, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary 



Vice President for Health Affairs and 
Director of the Medical Center 

Vice President and Treasurer 

Vice President for Development 

Assistant to the President and 
Director of Communications 

Dean of the College 

Dean of the Graduate School 

Dean of the School of Law 

Dean of the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management 

Dean of the Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine 

Dean of the School of Business 
and Accountancy 

Dean of the Summer Session 

Coordinator of Student Services 

Dean of Men 

Dean of VJomen 

Director of Housing 

Director of the College Union 



46 



Linda Kelly (1981) 

BA, Wake Forest, MDiv. Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary 



loseph C McGill (1981) 
BA. SUNY (Cortland) 



Summer Resident Directo 
( Firs! Term 

Summer Resident Direclo 
{Second Term 



Edgar D. Christman (1956, 1961 ) Chaphm 

BA, ID, Wake Forest; BD, Southeastern Baptist Seminary, STM. Union Seminary 



Brian M, Austin (1975) 

BA, Monmouth, MSEd, PhD, Southern Illinois 

Mary Ann H Taylor (1961. 1978) 
BS, MD, Wake Forest 



Director of the Center fo 
Psychological Service 

Director of University Student Health Service. 



Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Director of Records and Institutional Researcl 

BA, Mississippi Delta State, MA. PhD. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



Margaret R. Perry (1947) 
BS, South Carolina 

William G. Starling (1958) 
BBA. Wake Forest 

Carlos O Holder (1969) 
BBA, Wake Forest 



Registry 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aw 
Controller and Assistant Treasure/ 



G Eugene Hooks ( 1956) Director of Athletic. 

BS, Wake Forest, MEd, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); EdD, George Peabody 

Dorothy Casey ( 1949) Director of Women's Athletic. 

BS, Woman's College, North Carolina, MA. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 




47 



The Summer Faculty 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. 

;red Adams Visiting Associate Professor of Education 

PhD, University of Virginia 

mit Akinc (1983) Associate Professor of Business 

BS, Middle East Technical University (Ankara), 
MBA, Florida State, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

'alph D Amen ( 1962) Professor of Biology 

L BA, MA, Northern Colorado, MBS, PhD, Colorado 

)hn William Angell ( 1955) Professor of Religion 

BA, Wake Forest, STM, Andover Newton, ThM, PhD, Southern Baptist Seminary 

jmes P. Barefield ( 1963) Associate Professor of History 

BA, MA, Rice; PhD, lohns Hopkins 

1 Kenneth Bechtel (1981) Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology 

BA, MA, North Dakota 

.obert C. Beck ( 1959) Professor of Psychology 

jj BA, PhD, Illinois 

>eborah L, Best (1972, 1978) Assists Professor of Psychology 

= BA, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

.ouisa Branscomb Visiting Assistant Professor 

BA, Randolph-Macon Woman's College, of Education 

MA, Wake Forest 

)avid B Broyles ( 1966) Associate Professor of Politics 

BA, Chicago, BA, Florida, MA, PhD, California (Los Angeles) 

'Lilian Lopez Bueno ( 1978) Visiting Assistant Professor of 

PhB, Gregorian (Rome), BA, Pan-American, Romance Language 

MA, PhD, Texas Tech 

erry Martin Burger ( 1980) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

BA, MS, California State (Fresno), PhD, Missouri 

ulian C Burroughs |r (1958) Professor of Speech Communication 

BA, Wake Forest, MA, PhD, Michigan 

Richard D, Carmichael ( 1971 ) Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Wake Forest, MA, PhD, Duke 

Candide Carrasco ( 1981 ) Visiting Assistant Professor of 

L es L, M es L, Montpellier (France), Romance Languages 

PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

ohn E Collins (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

BS, MS, Tennessee, BD, Southern Baptist Seminary, PhD, Princeton 

-eon P. Cook |r (1957) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

BS, Virginia Polytechnic, MS, Tennessee, CPA, Arkansas 

\Iancy ). Cotton ( 1977) Associate Professor of English 

BA, Texas, MA, Wisconsin, PhD, Columbia 



48 

Cyclone Covey ( 1968) Professor of History 

BA, PhD. Stanford 

Mary K. DeShazer Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

BA, Western Kentucky, MA, Louisville, PhD, Oregon 

Arun P, Dewasthali (1975) Associate Professor of Business 

BS, Bombay; MS, PhD, Delaware 

lohn R Earle(1963) Professor of Sociology 

BA, Wake Forest, MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

C Drew Edwards ( 1980) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

BA, Furman, MA, Wake Forest, PhD, Florida State 

Tony Elavia (1982) Instructor in Economics 

BA, MA, Baroda (India), PhD, Houston 

Leo Ellison |r (1957) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

BS, MS. Northwestern State 

Thomas M Elmore (1962) Professor of Counseling Psychology 

BA, Wake Forest, MA, George Peabody, PhD. Ohio State 

David K Evans (1966) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

BS. Tulane. PhD, California 

Stephen Ewing (1971) Associate Professor of Busies; 

BS, Howard Payne; MBA, Baylor, DBA, Texas Tech 

Christopher P. Frost (1982) Visiting Assistant Professor o\ 

BA, Wake Forest, MA, Trinity (Connecticut), PhD, Cincinnati Classical Languages 

Ivey C Gentry ( 1949) Professor of Mathematus 

BS, Wake Forest; BS, New York, MA, PhD, Duke 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale ( I960) Professor of History and Asian Studies 

BA, MA. PhD, Bombay 

Paul M. Gross |r Associate Professor of Chemistry 

BS, Duke, PhD, Brown 

William H Gulley (1966) Associate Professor of Sociology 

BA, MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

E Willard Hamrick (1952) Professor of Religion 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill), PhD, Duke 

I Daniel Hammond (1978) Assistant Professor of Economics 

BA, Wake Forest, PhD. Virginia 

Elmer K Hayashi ( 1973) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

BA, California (Davis), MS, San Diego State, PhD, Illinois 

1. Edwin Hendricks (1961) Professor of History 

BA. Furman. MA, PhD, Virginia 

Marcus B, Hester ( 1963) Professor of Philosophy 

BA, Wake Forest, PhD. Illinois 

Billy I Hill Visiting Assistant Professor of History 

BA. Appalachian State; MA, Wake Forest, PhD, Florida State 



49 



•ed L. Horton |r. (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill), BD. Union Seminary, PhD, Duke 

,'illiam L. Hottinger (1970) Professor of Physical Education 

BS, Slippery Rock; MS, PhD, Illinois 

,evin W, Hoyle Visiting Instructor in Psychology 

BA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill); MA, Wake Forest 

,ichard P, Hydell (1981) Assistant Professor of Economics 

BA, Oberlin, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

elmer P. Hylton (1949) Professor of Accountancy 

BS, MBA, Indiana; CPA, Indiana 

Javid I. lohn (1982) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Emory and Henry, MS, PhD, Emory 

jlatherine A. lourdan (1981) Adjunct Instructor in Psychology 

BA, East Carolina; MEd, Wake Forest 

,alph C, Kennedy 111 (1976) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

BA, PhD, California (Berkley) 

;; ugo C. Lane (1973) Assistant Professor of Biology 

Licentiate of the Biological Sciences, Doctorate of the Biological Sciences, Geneva 

)hn H, Litcher ( 1973) Associate Professor of Education 

BS, Winona State, MA, PhD, Minnesota 

an S, Locklair ( 1982) Assistant Professor of Music 

BM, Mars Hill, SMM, Union Seminary, DMA, Eastman School of Music 

arry G. Maine ( 1981 ) Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

BA, Virginia, MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

lilorad R, Margitic ( 1978) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

MA, Leiden (Netherlands), PhD, Wayne State 

'ale R Martin ( 1982) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

BS, MS, Illinois State, DBA, Kentucky 

iregorio C, Martin ( 1976) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Diplome, Salamanca (Spain), MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

. ; eorge Eric Matthews |r. ( 1979) Assistant Professor of Physics 

BS, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Gaylord May ( 1961 ) Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Wofford, MA. PhD, Virginia 

/. Graham May ( 1961 ) Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Wofford, MA, PhD, Virginia 

Dseph O. Milner ( 1969) Associate Professor of Education 

BA, Davidson, MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Carlton T. Mitchell ( 1961 ) Professor of Religion 

BA, Wake Forest, BD, Yale, STM, Union Seminary, PhD, New York 

William M, Moss ( 1971 ) Associate Professor of English 

BA, Davidson, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



50 

Candelas M Newton (1978) Assistant Professor of Romance Language 

BA. Salamanca (Spain), MA. PhD, Pittsburgh 

lohn W. Nowell (1945) Professor of Chemistn 

BS, Wake Forest, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

lames C O'Flaherty ( 1947) Professor of Germat 

BA, Georgetown College; MA, Kentucky; PhD, Chicago 

A Thomas Olive ( 1961 ) Associate Professor of Biolofli 

BS, Wake Forest, MA, PhD, North Carolina State 

Willie Pearson |r (1980) Assistant Professor of Sociologi 

BS, Wiley, MA, Atlanta, PhD, Southern Illinois (Carbondale) 

Philip 1 Perncone ( 1967) Associate Professor of Sociologi 

BS, MA, Florida; PhD, Kentucky 

Herman I Preseren ( 1953) Professor of Educatioi 

BS, California State (Pennsylvania), MA, Columbia, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hil 

Gregory D Pritchard ( 1968) Professor of Philosophy 

BA, Oklahoma Baptist, BD, Southern Baptist Seminary, PhD, Columbia 

Martin R. Province (1982) Assistant Director of Instruments 

BA, Wake Forest Ensemble'. 

1 Don Reeves (1967) Professor of Education, 

BA, Mercer, BD, ThM, Southern Baptist Seminary, EdD. Columbia 

Ion M Remhardt ( 1964) Professor of Politic 

BA, Birmingham-Southern, MA, PhD, Tulane 

Robert W Reising Visiting Associate Professor of Education 

MA, Connecticut, PhD, Duke 

Mark R. Reynolds ( 1979) Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

BA, William and Mary, MA, Exeter (England) 

Michael L Roberts (1983) Assistant Professor of Accountancy 

BBA MA, ID, Georgia 

Ben I Robertson (1983) Visiting Instructor in Anthropology 

BA, Maryland, MA, Brown 

lohn E. Rowland ( 1982) Visiting Assistant Professor of Classical Language'. 

BA, Bryan College; MA, Indiana 

Marianne A Schubert ( 1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

BA, Dayton, MA, PhD, Southern Illinois 

Franklin R Shirley (1948) Professor of Speech Communication 

BA. Georgetown, MA, Columbia, PhD. Florida 

Robert N Shorter (1958) Professor of English 

BA, Union College, MA, PhD, Duke 

Nancy Shelton ( 1980) Visiting Assistant Professor of Education 

BA, High Point College; MEd, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Michael L Sinclair ( 1968) Associate Professor of History 

BA, Wake Forest, MA, PhD, Stanford 



! 










51 


I 

: ivid L. Smiley (1950) 

BA, MA, Baylor; PhD, W 


sconsin 






Professor of History 


Howell Smith (1965) 

BA, Baylor, MA, Tulane, 


PhD, 


Wisconsin 






Associate Professor of History 


icilia H. Solano (1977) 
BA, Radcliffe; MA, PhD, 


lohns 


Hopkins 






Assistant Professor of Psychology 


'-izabeth A. Sutherland (1982) 
BFA, Boston; MFA, Temple 








instructor in Art 


anton K. Tefft (1964) 

BA, Michigan State; MS 


Wisconsin, PhD, 


Minnesota 


Professor of Anthropology 


ilph B. Tower (1980) 

BA, PhD, North Carolina 


(Cha 


pel Hill); MBA, 


Cornell 


Associate Professor of Accountancy 


lvia Trelles (1977) 

BA, Ripon, MA, Michigan 








Instructor in Romance Languages 



'arcellus E. Waddill (1962) Professor of Mathematics 

BA, Hampden-Sydney, MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

felen Warren Visiting Instructor in Speech Communication 

BS, Southwest Missouri State, MA, North Carolina (Chapel Hill] 

nice G. Williams Visiting \nstructor in Psychology 

BA, MA, Wake Forest 

hn E. Williams ( 1959) Professor of Psychology 

BS, Richmond, MS, PhD, Iowa 

Ned Woodall ( 1969) Professor of Anthropology 

BA, MA, Texas, PhD, Southern Methodist 

3ymond L. Wyatt (1956) Professor of Biology 

BS, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

lie H. Yu (1983) Instructor in Business 

BA, MS, MBA, Missouri (Columbia) 



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